THE WHAT AND WHY FOR A CONVENTION OF STATES

Article V of the Constitution provides two methods for offering amendments. One way is for the Congress to do so, which is the method that has always been used. But there is another method that allows the states to convene a convention wherein amendments may be proposed without the input of Congress. That is the bolded text in Article V above.

Why pursue this? Because government, and the career politicians who control it, are the problem. They will never voluntarily self-limit or give up the power, authority, and wealth they have amassed for themselves. Our Founders, well-versed in dealing with an oppressive government, anticipated this very situation. It is why they included this codicil in the Constitution. It is America’s “escape hatch.”

If you accept the premise that the real battle is Washington vs. Main Street America, that it is government and career politicians of both political stripes who are the problem, then it quickly becomes clear that no solutions will be forthcoming from within the current political paradigm. Expecting a return to limited government and individual liberty to emerge out of an election, a political cycle, a new fresh face, or switching out which party runs Congress or the White House, will not cure what ails us. Under the badly bent system that now exists, our traditional political salves no longer work. So at this point we must ask ourselves, what, if any, means of redress do we have?

In the army, leaders are taught that when confronted with an untenable situation in combat, in order to win they must find a way to change the conditions on the battlefield. That’s the objective of my book, to describe why and how Main Street America must change the conditions on the political battlefield. I am convinced that as long as we play according to the Beltway’s rules, we, the people, will continue to lose. Big. But when Main Street America finds a way to dictate terms to Washington, Main Street America will win. Fortunately for us, the Founders provided us with the means for doing exactly that, in Article V of the Constitution: a Convention of States.

I believe two critical amendments should emerge from such a Convention—constitutional amendments that will help reboot this nation:

First, congressional term limits are necessary in order to rid ourselves of career politicians and the havoc they are wreaking. My book details how the country went from “citizen legislators” to career politicians, and the ramifications thereof.

Second, a carefully crafted balanced-budget amendment is necessary to hinder and reverse the growth of government and to rein in out-of-control government spending. My book also explains how and why America drifted from our core constitutional values and how it has led directly to our present anemic situation at home and abroad.

Congress could self-limit, but it won’t. It is up to us—We the people—to do so.

Love your country, not your government.

Colonel George Mason of Virginia was responsible for insisting that an alternate method of proposing Amendments be included in Article V of the Constitution.

Article V of the U.S. Constitution

The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as Part of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate.

​     C o l o n e l   P a t r i c k   M u r r a y